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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
that they have the capacity to be able to build and have the missile technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this, as i said earlier, would be very destabilizing, i think, to not only the region, but to the international security environment. who's helping them in my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time in such a short period of time and how that -- what they've done to correct it, i can't tell you how they assess that. we'll just have to -- should they choose to go ahead with it, we'll just have to see how it goes. >> -- moving into the region to monitor this? >> well, i won't go into the specifics of how we or our allies position ourselves to insure that we understand what's happening, but we do watch this very carefully, watch it very closely. of course, in my role as the pa-com co
-- philanthropist, he has a wide array of business interests. he's a pioneer in the use of technology and medicine and helped bring telemedicine to rural health care facilities as chairman of the rural health care corporation. he was appointed by president clinton to the board of the national science foundation. and as a young man, he took a break from his studies at columbia where he roomed with art garfunkel to work in the nixon white house. all of this makes a substantive, meaningful contribution to our country. but there is one thing i have not yet mentioned. at the young age of 19, sandy went blind. he lost his sight, and with that all likely hope of a successful completion of his college career or a successful career in life. he was told by the social workers who met with him after glaucoma stole his sight from him that his future would likely consist of assembling screwdriver kits in a sheltered workshop in his hometown in upstate new york. but it's because of the kindness and the intervention of his roommates, art garfunkel and others who volunteered who dedicated countless hours to readin
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
or israel getting the technology being able to reach the united states, this is the sort of classic paradigm. the stock of the sum of all fears which is nuclear terrorism. i don't know if you want to comment on what are the risks, what are the real risks of wmd terrorism? >> there are significant risks to the terrorism. we all know the risks in the nuclear bomb and the part of los angeles etc am i etc, but when you look at the chemical and biological, they're also very significant threats there. for instance, you can look at what happened in the world war ii. the japanese army dropped infected fleas and china with 50,000 people, kind of a biotech they killed 50,000 people. chemical weapons, world war i chemical weapons killed at least 90,000 people. and you have these terrorist groups in the middle east. al qaeda has tried very hard for years to develop wmd. probably the closest they came was a group of retired pakistani leaders, really the nuclear program who teamed up with al qaeda to try to help al qaeda to develop the wmd. luckily they were cracked down upon before things got too far dow
willing to marshal the various forces from technology to different incentive designed to make sure you have a better outcome. and again i think this is another place where progressives should be, not be fearful. that view of the evaluation evidence-based change is behind the presidency race to the top, innovation funds, proposals would have liked career academies, home visits by nurses or at risk children, our pity, all of these are based on -- are that a, what's working and a commitment to put more resources kind innovation and then continually test that innovation for results. now that said, i do think that when we call for more accountability, more evidence-based evaluation, it is important that we leave but it is also important that we do not allow programs that are for, let's say for children to somehow become the victims of a double higher standard. i've seen this too many times. winner research strategy for cancer -- win a research strategy for cancer goes awry, they say let's evaluate, let's figure out what we did it wrong and let's do better in future. they don't say, well, th
to be incredible, future fighter planes that will be incredible. we've got great technologies, but none of that, none of that is worth a damn without the men and women in uniforms who were led to the dead lights on. that is the real strength. that is the heart and soul of what makes us the strongest country in the world. we owe them as a result of that the finest medical care that this nation can provide. and that's why i'm so grateful that we have the greatest medical health care system in the world right here. the strength of our system wise if you and people like you, thousands of dedicated professionals who are committed to caring for her sick and four injured, lies with each of you. this, as i've said before is a place where miracles happen and you are the miracle workers. today i went to thank you along with the entire military medical community for the exceptional care and the exceptional support that you provide for our servicemembers, the men and women in uniform. for their families and for military retirees, who give them them -- you give them a second chance at life. this community i
such as how the rail authority expects to adapt existing high speed rail technology to the project in california. the cost estimates are accurate, and they are based on the most and projects go, including inflation adjustment and it contained few mathematical errors. and regards to documentation, while most assumptions and methodology are well documented, in some cases we're not able to trace the final cost estimate back to the source documentation. we also could not verify how certain cost components such as change and stations were counted. having complete documentation is important. so the changes to the estimates can be tracked and updated, and key decisions documented and defensible. finally, with regard to the cost estimate credibility, the rail authority did conduct a sensitivity analysis and an independent cost estimate, but these were limited to the initial construction segments. in addition, it did not conduct risk and uncertainty analysis to determine the likelihood that the estimates would be met. without these steps, decision-makers cannot identify the risks that may a
and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind of skill acquisition but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure it is her student aid programs don't stand in whether. let me give you an example. right now what we have is student aid like pell aid like pell grants or the loan programs, they have credit institutions. they don't have credit courses. so that is a way towards conditional for your land grant university, nothing wrong with it. i went to a school that is about -- to be crushed by the sugar bowl. anyway, a few points of mitch mcconnell. but what about the folks that don't want to do that and can't do that? they want to take a course, online course fiscal year an online credit the school over you. we should credit courses so we're not discriminating against allowing people to us acquire skills in that setting. i think we have to reform our loan programs to reflect the 21st century students. the second thing i would do is make sure we have more informat
the obama campaign communicating with folks, with new technologies. you also had a lot of segmentation. one of the reasons that i was able to do, um, interviews in all the places that i talked about, i happen to speak a very neutral spanish. you can't really place my spanish geographically. kind of quirky set of reasons. and that allowed osa to use me in multiple places. i did one interview all fall, which was orlando, which has a large spanish-language media, but it's a puerto rican electorate. and you don't need somebody with my skill set or even my neutral spanish speaking to puerto ricans. you need fellow puerto ricans speaking to puerto ricans. and that's also true in other parts of the country. there was a much more deliberate effort this time to insure in ads and in media outreach and just people-to-people outreach that you were speaking to and through folks from the same subgroup. >> and different issues as well? i mean, does immigration come into -- >> interesting, the issues this time at least in my experience, and you saw this borne out a little bit in the national exit polls, th
of technology, you know, to do manufacturing right now is not what it used to be. you need to have computer skills. you need to have certainly very good work skills. a lot of people need more post secondary education. i have a proposal that would give some tax credits for advanced manufacturing they're making products. other nations are doing this to the e.u. is doing it. you think it's all about competing with china but, in fact, were competing with other advanced economies, and we need to make sure that we're functioning in a global marketplace, both manufacturing and marketing. so we need some work to be done in making sure our tax policy really does look to the future and how we grow entrepreneur but the last thing i was is that basic investment in research, also not to be taken lightly. medical research, research on new energy resources. entrepreneur come out often of these kind of events is where we see basic research funded by the government that we take for granted. if we keep cutting that, if we're not sure about, even r&d tax credits is very important to companies. are in the tax
:30 a.m. [inaudible conversations] >> okay. i gather we are having a little problem with the technology here. so, let's get on to our panel discussion moderated by nancy cook of national journal uncovers the budget and taxes. quite a superstar in our company . she is going to introduce the panelist. let me say, one change. hi cain will be speaking instead of michael devonshire. american progress. so it's all yours. >> waiting for one more person. yes. the grand entrance. thank you so much for joining us. we have a great panel with a lot of different expertise. we have anthony right here, the director of the georgetown university center on education and the work force. we have the vice-president and co-director of the economic studies program at the brookings institution. we have the center for american progress of vice-president there. and then we have the president and ceo of the national small business association. so i thought we would just dive right in. you know, we talked a lot about the polling. and curious to know what aspect of the polling surprised all of you the most about wh
their policies. this starts with a much wider embrace of agriculture technology, including genetically modified techniques. the risks of climate change intensify this imperative. even as we deal with potential resource constraints, our country remains vulnerability to -- remains vulnerable to terrorism and assymetric warfare. access to the internet and social media has deeply altered international politics. in most cases for the better, but it's also contributed to instability, to sudden upheavals, like the arab spring. it's allowed destructive terrorist movements like al qaeda to franchise themselves. it's intensified risks of cyber attacks, espionage and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. the potential catastrophe remains of a major terrorist attack on america and employing weapons of mass destruction. and if that happens, in addition to the lives lost, our expectations for economic growth and budget balancing could be set back by even a decade or more. having devoted considerable time to this problem, my experience is that there are no silver bullets. protecting the united sta
-profit college. he attended the international academy of design and technology, a for-profit college in chicago owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. the
in science, technology, and space exploration. when the nasa rover curiosity thrilled all of us with its perfect landing on mars this past august, the hands of kay's legislative leadership were on the controls. working with kay as a member of the appropriations committee, i know just how dedicated she is to ensuring that taxpayers' dollars are spent wisely and efficiently. she is a champion for our small business owners and for policies that promote free enterprise and job creation. her complete commitment to the men and women of our armed forces is reflected in her years of service on the armed services committee as well as the military construction subcommittee on appropriations and her unanimous election this year to serve as chairman of the board of visitors at west point. mr. president, in the afterward to her book, kay wrote that as a young girl growing up in texas, she was so inspired by the lives of great americans that by the sixth grade she had exhausted all of the biographies on the school library shelf and had to turn elsewhere for book report material. i'm sure that the stor
. we also know that technology is developing, social media and all the rest, which makes it easier for someone on route 128 in boston or savannah, georgia, to have a bigger impact. we are seeing the issues are increasingly coming down to a tough choices, tough choices of business leaders. host: how would they characterize regulations? guest: generally, regulations rank high. you have large financial services companies concerned with dodd-frank. you also have smaller businesses that are concerned the big banks are not lending. so they both have different views on financial services. host: a republican from missouri says -- guest: if you think about that, how difficult it is for small business leader affected by a particular regulation to come to washington and talk to the finals or talk to congress about the best way to fix it. what we are trying to do is bring business leaders together at scale, so their input can go directly to those who are producing the regulations. on the regulatory front, a person who recently was running the office of regulatory affairs, his team was very agg
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)